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We are building a climate-smart system for Sweden's cheapest district heating

LKAB, the Municipality of Kiruna and Tekniska Verken i Kiruna AB are now preparing to build Kiruna's new energy system. The aim is reduced environmental impact and Sweden's lowest district heating tariff. Construction will begin in 2015.

LKAB, the Municipality of Kiruna and Tekniska Verken i Kiruna AB are now preparing to build Kiruna's new energy system. The aim is reduced environmental impact and Sweden's lowest district heating tariff. Construction will begin in 2015.

When LKAB upgrades magnetite ore to pellets, the residual heat that is produced can be used to supply Kiruna's entire district heating system. Residual heat will be an available resource as long as mining operations continue in Kiruna. LKAB, the Municipality of Kiruna and Tekniska Verken i Kiruna AB want to use this to advantage.

 “The urban transformation now under way in Kiruna is an opportunity to create one of the world's most sustainable communities. Construction of low-energy homes and buildings, better use of LKAB's residual heat and a new district heating system will make Kiruna very energy efficient," says Jan Fjordell, CEO, Tekniska Verken i Kiruna AB.

Pre-studies and analysis of potential solutions and technologies have been done over the past several years. Now, the plans are being realized. We will link LKAB and Tekniska Verken i Kiruna AB's systems and phase out the use of fossil fuels for heat production. Construction of the new energy system will commence in the summer of 2015. Pre-project planning will begin this autumn.

 “We will reduce LKAB's own energy demand. At the same time, we are adapting technologies for heat recovery from other industries, so they work with our upgrading process. In this way, a surplus of heat energy that can be used for district heating will be made available," explains Stefan Savonen, department manager, energy & climate systems at LKAB.

When the energy system is fully developed, the entire municipal district heating demand will be met solely with the use of residual heat. The new system means that use of fossil fuels for heat production can be phased out completely.

LKAB's residual heat now accounts for about five percent of Kiruna's district heat production. Energy recovery from household and industrial waste makes up 75 percent. The balance is made up by district heat produced from wood chips, peat, electricity and oil. In the future energy system, residual heat from mineral processing will account for 90 percent of the district heating requirement. Biofuels will cover the remaining 10 percent when LKAB's processing plants are standing still, for example, during maintenance periods.

 “The new system saves money for Kiruna's district heating customers. We're very pleased that pre-project planning is now under way," says Lars Törnman, chairman of Tekniska Verken i Kiruna AB.

 “This collaboration creates the conditions for a sustainable and energy-efficient community for the residents of Kiruna. Together, we are creating an attractive Kiruna," says Kristina Zakrisson, municipal commissioner, Kiruna.

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